English Language Class: Between Am tired and I’m tired

Between Am tired and I’m tired

Akeem Lasisi; lasisienglish@gmail.com; 08163939335

An apostrophe performs several functions in English language. It can show possession, as we have in This is the tailor’s house, telling us whose house it is. Often, when a noun is singular, the apostrophe comes before the s (tailor’s); but when it is plural, it comes after it, as we have in The tailors’ cars are wrongly parked. Another example is, “They have replaced the boys’ chairs.”

One other major function of an apostrophe is that it shows that letters and numbers have been omitted in certain expressions. This is what obtains in isn’t, don’t and didn’t. Some of the terms usually so contracted are, however, too intriguing to handle for many of us. We are focusing on such today.

What do you think about the following statements?

Am 30 years old.

A’m 30 years old.

I’am 30 years old.

I’m 30 years’ old.

I’m 30 years old.

Of all the five, it is only one that is correct. That is the last: I’m 30 years old. In the clause, the use of the apostrophe between I and am shows that a letter has been omitted; that omitted item is the a before m in am. Unfortunately, this is often confused with Am, when people say Am here. This is a wrong expression that you should shun whether in conventional writing or social media conversation.

Using Am instead of ‘I’m’ implies that you do not understand the principle behind the shortening of the original expression. In Am, you are not properly indicating the letter omitted. It is not I that is omitted, it is the a in am. So, the apostrophe is used to bring I and m together:

I am tired. (Correct)

Am tired. (Wrong)

I’m tired. (Correct)

Between his and he’s

Using his and he’s can also be problematic. The first – his – is a pronoun, a possessive pronoun that does not require an apostrophe, as we rightly have in This is his car, meaning the car belongs to him and not to any other person. You need not add any other item to this, just as you do not add an apostrophe to her, their, its and my. Or would you feel comfortable saying or writing, This is her’s house?

On the other hand, he’s comes with an apostrophe because there is an omission. The i before s (is) is deliberately thrown out. To indicate this, an apostrophe is needed:

He is trying to repair the table. (Correct)

He’s trying to repair the table. (Correct)

His trying to repair the table. (Wrong)

His trying to repair the table is ridiculous. (Correct)

Also, note that ‘he’s’ can also mean ‘he has’, depending on the context:

He has gone. (Correct)

He’s gone. (Correct)

Similarly, she’s and it’s’ can work with both the present tense and present participle:

She is here. (Correct)

She’s here. (Correct)

She has arrived. (Correct)

She’s arrived. (Correct)

It is here (Correct)

It’s here. (Correct)

It has finished.

It’s finished. (Correct)

Of course, ‘she’d’ can also mean ‘she had’ and ‘she would’:

She had gone before the policeman arrived. (Correct)

She’d gone before the policemen arrived. (Correct)

I thought she would sign the memo before leaving. (Correct)

I thought she’d sign the memo before leaving. (Correct)

Answers to last week’s assignment

He was suspended … that he disobeyed the MD’s directive.
(a) because of the ground (d) due to the ground (c) ON

THE GROUNDS (d) on the ground

We need … united country.
(a)A (b) an (c) very (d) more

I can’t quote the statistics …
(a) OFF HAND (b) off handed (c) off head (d) off heads

Homework

Dele … finished cleaning the table when the visitors
arrived.

(a) haven’t (b) hasn’t (c) had’nt (d) hadn’t

I have noted your request. But … not what I can do now.
(a) is (b) its (c) it’s (d) it

Many people were amazed when Messi dribbled … all the
defenders.

(a)past (b) pass (c) passed (d) pushed

Credit: The Punch

Against odds: Blind from childhood, Hafsat is now a lawyer

Blind from childhood, Hafsat is now a lawyer

By Maryam Ahmadu-Suka,

Hafsat Suleiman, a Law graduate of the Ahmadu Bello University, was recently called to bar after completing Law School. Third in a family of 10, Hafsat’s remarkable achievement was celebrated widely on social media, as she had lost her sight at a young age. She shared her inspiring story with Daily Trust Saturday. Excerpts:

Daily Trust: How did you lose your sight?

I was just three-years-old then, so there are many things that I cannot remember and even when I was told, I could not hold on to them.

DT: What are some challenges you faced in school, en route becoming a lawyer?

The first was that I was not allowed to attend any school of my choice like any other person, I had to attend Kaduna State Special Education school because that was the only school people like me can go to. After my primary school, I attended WTC in Katsina before I moved to Girls High school, Kindire in Jos, where I did my JSS 1 and 2. I later moved to Government Secondary School, Kwali in Abuja where I completed my secondary education. Then, after my secondary education, I got admission to study Law at the Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Zaria.

In ABU, the challenges came right from the entry point, because my dean insisted on not admitting me into the faculty because he felt the school did not have the facilities for me to study. It was with the help of God and the intervention of so many people that he agreed to admit me. There were other challenges like buying handouts, since they were not in Braille, so I had to either get someone to read with me because I was not brailing them and I was not recording, or make the handouts into soft copies and play on my laptop which has a software that converts text into speech.

Also, some of the lecturers were not helpful. But some were always there for me. Some of the lecturers were authors of the books we used during the course, so I would ask them for the soft copies; some of them gave me, but other would tell me they do not have it or would not even listen to me. But by the grace of God, here I am.

DT: How were you able to move around campus?

I had people who were always there for me, and even when I took courses they were not taking then, they would make sure I attend my lectures. Sometimes one of them would take me there, accompany me to the lecture hall and even if my close friends were not there, I would always find someone to help. They even go out of their way to take me back to my hostel.

DT: What informed your decision to study law?

Growing up, I never thought of becoming a lawyer because I my father wanted me to be a Physiotherapist and up to my secondary school, I was still holding on to that. But then, when I later understood that the educational system is not favourable, I decided to change course and even then, I never thought of studying Law. I never wanted to study any course that has been labelled for disabled people even though there are people that have decided to offer such courses. I never wanted people to rule my life and make decisions for me just because I am physically challenged.

When I was in secondary school, a counsellor opened up to me and told me I could not study sciences, and I would have to choose between arts and social sciences. Back then, when I chose art, I kept wondering what I was going to do with it. I do not know how come, but it came one day and I decided to study Law because I felt it was interesting and I would at least have the opportunity of giving the voiceless a voice.

DT: What call would you make to others living with disability?

They should never give up, and always, always hold their head up high.

DT: What is your next step after being called to the bar?

I’m presently serving with a law firm and I hope to practice after my NYSC, but our society is not supportive of people like me. I know that if I am in a room with another lawyer, the client will definitely pick the other lawyer because of my disability. And even if he picks me and in the end, we lose the case, the client will say it’s because I am physically-challenged. Society needs to stop the discrimination of people like me.

When I was at the Special Education School, I noticed that the children were forced to learn with people older than them, thereby taking away their childhood. I pray that by the grace of God, I will be able to establish a foundation for special children, and even if I am able to cater to only two children, I would be happy and grateful.

Credit: Daily Trust

Polytechnic lecturers declare indefinite strike

‘No going back on our indefinite strike’

MAPOLY lecturers declare ‘work-to-rule’ strike
The Academic Staff Union of Polytechnics (ASUP) on Tuesday said there was no going back on its planned indefinite strike beginning on Dec. 12 in all the nation’s polytechnics.

Mr Usman Dutse, the National President of the union made the declaration in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Lagos.

Dutse said that the strike became necessary following the failure of the Federal Government to implement the 2009 and 2017 agreements reached with the union.

According to him, we are commencing our strike tomorrow as scheduled. Everything is set and there is no going back.

“There is an invitation for a meeting on Dec. 17, but we will still commence our strike on Wednesday.

“I don’t know what will happen at the meeting or what they have decided, but until we meet with them, we cannot predict.

”I don’t know what they plan to present until we meet with them,“ he said.

Duste said that the strike would be comprehensive and total, until all issues raised were adequately addressed by the government.

He said the union had issued a notice directing all members nationwide to comply and down tools by midnight of Dec.12.

The president said the union leaders would also send a reminder to all its branches, adding that there would be no academic activities in all the polytechnics until further notice.

Dutse said that the failure of the Federal Government and the Minister of Education, Malam Adamu Adamu, to comply with the agreements reached with the union necessitated the strike.

He said the union had in 2009 signed an agreement with the government and also a Memorandum of Action in 2017, adding that none of the agreements had been implemented.

Speaking on the resolution reached at the union’s 93rd National Executive Council (NEC) meeting held in Yaba College of Technology, Lagos State on Nov. 29, Dutse said the strike was inevitable. He said the union had issued a notice directing all members nationwide to comply and down tools by midnight of Tuesday, Dec.12.
He said that the union would also send a reminder to its branches on Wednesday.

He listed the 10 point demands of the union to include non-implementation of NEED ASSESSMENT reports of 2014 as agreed with the minister at the meeting of October 2017.

“They are lack of seriousness in the renegotiation in the union’s 2010 agreement; non-release of arrears of CONTISS 15 migration for the lower cadre; non-release of arrears of promotions and shortfalls in personnel releases as well as non-payment of allowances.

“Other agitations are non-payment of salaries in many state-owned polytechnics, non-payment of union check off dues, pension deductions and other statutory deductions from staff salaries to the appropriate bodies, continue victimisation of union officers,“ he said. (NAN)

NOUN graduates now free to undergo NYSC, Law School as Buhari signs new Act

Buhari approves NYSC, Law School for NOUN graduates

By Ismail Mudashir |

President Muhammadu Buhari has assented to the National Open University Amendment Act, to allow the institution to operate as all other universities in the country.

Daily Trust reports that with the assent, the graduates of the NOUN can now participate in the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) and the Nigerian Law School.

Presidential Assistant on National Assembly (Senate), Senator Ita Enang announced the assent of the President while addressing State House reporters in Abuja.

” President Buhari has also assented to National Open University Amendment Act, which allows the National Open University to operate as all other universities, having the same power and functions and the same administrative structures eliminating possible discrimination as some use to want to have on its products and programmes.

” It has also allowed the establishment of some centres to be called study centres and given conditions for the establishment of such study centres,” he said.

The National Assembly had passed a bill for An Act to Amend the National Open University Act Cap N6 LFN 1983 (Amendment) Bill 2017’.

Credit: Daily Trust

ASUU STRIKE: FG withdraws ‘no work no pay’ threat as negotiation continues Tuesday

ASUU STRIKE: FG withdraws ‘no work no pay’ threat

‘No work no pay’ policy not applicable to ASUU — Falana

By Dayo Adesulu & Johnbosco Agbakwuru

ABUJA—THE Federal Government has withdrawn the recent threat to activate the ‘no work no pay policy’ against striking university teachers.

No work, no pay policy: Labour threatens to report FG to ILO

This was disclosed by the National President of the Academic Staff Union of Universities, ASUU, Prof. Biodun Ogunyemi, in an exclusive chat with Vanguard yesterday.

Ogunyemi also said that the negotiation meeting between ASUU and the Federal Government would continue tomorrow, stressing that what the union was doing was to rescue the education sector from imminent collapse and to ensure that the children of the poor get access to quality and affordable education.

The ASUU boss also said that last Friday’s meeting between the two parties did not yield much results.

He said: “Well, we have confirmed that they have withdrawn that threat (no work no pay). So it appears the threat is not there for now. But even if the threat is there, we are prepared for that because for our members, no sacrifice is too much to salvage Nigeria’s education.

“Shortly before our action while the NLC (Nigeria Labour Congress) hullabaloo was going on with federal government, they went to the Federal Executive Council that they were activating that rule.”

Meanwile, human rights lawyer, Mr. Femi Falana, SAN said yesterday: ”Although the Federal Government referred to “extant rules” to justify the ‘no work, no pay’ policy the directive is anchored on section 43 (1) of the Trade Disputes Act which provides that “any worker who takes part in a strike shall not be entitled to any wages or other remuneration for the period of the strike…”. In resorting to the desperate measure the Federal Government was not properly advised. Otherwise, it would have realized that even under the defunct military junta the application of ‘no work no pay’ rule, threat to eject lectures living in official quarters, promulgation of a decree which made strike in schools a treasonable offence and the proscription of ASUU did not collapse any of the strikes called by ASUU.

”It is submitted that the latest strike embarked upon by ASUU has complied with the provisions of section 31 (6) of the Trade

Disputes (Amendment) Act, 2005. Since the law does not punish acts which are lawful in any democratic society section 43(1) of the Trade Disputes Act cannot be invoked to justify the seizure of the salaries and allowances of members of the ASUU who have decided to participate in an industrial action that is legal in every material particular. Under the current labour law regime only those who take part in illegal strikes are liable to be prosecuted and forfeit their salaries and allowances.

Credit: Vanguard

WASSCE: 36% credit pass recorded as WAEC releases 2018 private candidates results

WAEC releases 2018 WASSCE private candidates results

By Anietie Akpan, Calabar

The result of the 2018 West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) for private candidates, second series has been released.

The Head of the Nigeria National Office of the WAEC, Mr. Olu Adenipekun, who announced this yesterday at a press briefing in Transcorp Hotels, Calabar, said 112,567 candidates registered in Nigeria out of which 109,902 candidates sat for the examination.He stated that out of the 109,902, “107,749 candidates representing 94.04 percent have their results fully processed and released while 2,153 candidates representing 1.96 percent have a few of their subjects still being processed due to errors traceable to the candidates in the course of registration or writing the examination.”

Giving a breakdown of the performance of the candidates, Adenipekun said: “Out of the 109,902 candidates that sat for the examination, 63,037 representing 57.36 percent obtained credit and above in a minimum of any five subjects, that is with or without English language and or Mathematics (while) 39,557 candidates representing 35.99 percent obtained credits and above in a minimum of five subjects including English and Mathematics.”

Adenipekun, who was flanked by other top members of the council, advised candidates to check for their results online using the checker PIN and serial number as contained in the candidate’s smart identity card used during the examination and certificates of candidates whose results have been fully processed and released will be ready in 90 days from yesterday.

During question and answer session, he said that cases of examination malpractice was very low or insignificant because the number of candidates that sat for the examination was quite lower as compared to the school examinations. “We ensured that WAEC officials were in all the centres, and the issue of collusion and use of mobile phones were nipped in the bud.”

On the low percentage of scores for candidates who got five credits and above including English Language and mathematics, he explained: “We cannot say that the percentage is low but we need to draw the attention of the nation to the fact that it is a make up examination” to complement an earlier result.

On e-testing, Adenipekun said: “WAEC is doing everything possible to play required roll as far as e-testing is concerned but WAEC is meant to test the performance of candidates as per their learning in school and e-testing in schools. We must have e-learning before we can have e-testing.

“If we go ahead to say all our candidates should use e-test, we will not be seen doing what we are supposed to do. We are supposed to do e-testing and not aptitude test so that they can demonstrate effectively what they have learnt.But we are not resting, hence the need for us to draw the attention of the nation to the teaching of e-learning in schools”.

Source: Guardian

WASSCE: 36% credit pass recorded as WAEC releases 2018 private candidates results

WAEC releases 2018 WASSCE private candidates results

By Anietie Akpan, Calabar

The result of the 2018 West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) for private candidates, second series has been released.

The Head of the Nigeria National Office of the WAEC, Mr. Olu Adenipekun, who announced this yesterday at a press briefing in Transcorp Hotels, Calabar, said 112,567 candidates registered in Nigeria out of which 109,902 candidates sat for the examination.He stated that out of the 109,902, “107,749 candidates representing 94.04 percent have their results fully processed and released while 2,153 candidates representing 1.96 percent have a few of their subjects still being processed due to errors traceable to the candidates in the course of registration or writing the examination.”

Giving a breakdown of the performance of the candidates, Adenipekun said: “Out of the 109,902 candidates that sat for the examination, 63,037 representing 57.36 percent obtained credit and above in a minimum of any five subjects, that is with or without English language and or Mathematics (while) 39,557 candidates representing 35.99 percent obtained credits and above in a minimum of five subjects including English and Mathematics.”

Adenipekun, who was flanked by other top members of the council, advised candidates to check for their results online using the checker PIN and serial number as contained in the candidate’s smart identity card used during the examination and certificates of candidates whose results have been fully processed and released will be ready in 90 days from yesterday.

During question and answer session, he said that cases of examination malpractice was very low or insignificant because the number of candidates that sat for the examination was quite lower as compared to the school examinations. “We ensured that WAEC officials were in all the centres, and the issue of collusion and use of mobile phones were nipped in the bud.”

On the low percentage of scores for candidates who got five credits and above including English Language and mathematics, he explained: “We cannot say that the percentage is low but we need to draw the attention of the nation to the fact that it is a make up examination” to complement an earlier result.

On e-testing, Adenipekun said: “WAEC is doing everything possible to play required roll as far as e-testing is concerned but WAEC is meant to test the performance of candidates as per their learning in school and e-testing in schools. We must have e-learning before we can have e-testing.

“If we go ahead to say all our candidates should use e-test, we will not be seen doing what we are supposed to do. We are supposed to do e-testing and not aptitude test so that they can demonstrate effectively what they have learnt.But we are not resting, hence the need for us to draw the attention of the nation to the teaching of e-learning in schools”.

Source: Guardian

Expert task students, school leavers on self-reliance

EXPERTS TASK NIGERIAN STUDENTS ON SELF-RELIANCE

A cross section of students participants

The Nigerian students have been charged to be tenacious in building individual capacity and self-worth to shore up their core value in life.

This task was given to secondary school leavers in Agege, Lagos State, by experts and facilitators at the 7th edition of Beyond Secondary Education: What Next? (BSEWN), programme organised by Future Matters Concept (FMC) at Agege Local Government Education Authority conference centre with the theme
“Achieving Greatness through Positive Vibes”.

The Director-General, Quality Education Assurance, Ministry of Education, Lagos State, Ronke Soyombo, in a keynote address said that the theme of the program is pivotal in ensuring a brighter future of young people.

“According to the theme of this event, Achieving Greatness Through Positive Vibes, you have chosen to change the world of these future leaders by bringing out the best in them to achieving maximum self-discovery, repositioning them for purposeful leadership roles and transforming them into confident and purposeful individuals with maximum concentration.

Soyombo, who was represented by the Zonal Director, Quality Education Assurance, Alimoso zone, Mrs Ajose Kemi noted that there is a need for young people to know that they are the strength of the nation.

“As youths your shoulder lays the future leadership of this great nation, we are therefore preparing you for the leadership roles you are bound to play.

“Leadership is a professional cross you must all carry at one point or another and to become a leader is not on a platter of gold. Hard work, diligence, focus and determination are keys to becoming a successful leader”

Since leadership skills are not on a platter, you must continually be involved in capacity building to yield more productive results leading to improved learning and development.

“You must imbibe a work ethic that will propel you to the top with clear vision of what your goals are”.

”The educational and leadership skills you acquire will motivate and inspire you to the zenith of your chosen careers”.

Soyombo, charged the stakeholders to continue in the path to developing, educating and orientating the youths on the mantle that has been placed on them to be the linkage between the past, present and future of our country by unlocking the hidden potentials in them

“Let us reawaken entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation in all areas, let us get our youths off the streets, let us acculturate them with values, and let us create an enabling environment that would see them prosper and evidently reflecting in the progress and development of key areas of the Nigerian society”, she said while commending the convener, Adewale Adeleye, head strategist Future Matters Concepts for this laudable initiative

“No doubt, the future of these young leaders of tomorrow has taken the front burner in your vision of a robust future, opening doors to a whole lot of opportunities as they progress from one academic level to another”.

“In line with the objectives of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and Lagos State Office of Education Quality Assurance on Lagos State Child’s Right Law 2007 for quality education not for teaching and learning alone but to invest in the potentials of our teeming youths for a purposeful future through, most especially, harnessing the 21st skill acquisitions and entrepreneurship. Soyombo added.

In a remark by The Tutor General General/Permanent Secretary Lagos State Education District 1, Agege Dr. Folayinka Ayandele, opined that a child’s mindset could be an asset or a liability owing to what information is available for it to process and use.

Ayandele who was represented by Mrs Funmi Longe a Director of Administration and Human Resource at the Education District, established the fact that a child would either have a ‘Growing’ or a ‘Fixed’ mindset which majorly plays a pivotal role on who the individual eventually turns out to be in future.

“Idea rules the world and the information you are opened to will make or mar you, many in life tend to have fixed mindset rather than a growing mindset, they are not open to ideas, they tend to build a high wall around themselves, so they have no network and their progress in life is hampered”

“Achieving Greatness comes with various challenges that require serious dedication to one’s dreams and aspirations for a brighter future”

“As young people your positive attitude towards your dreams of a glorious future should give you solace and energy in the face of present challenges you might be expressing”

“The world celebrates exceptional youth, who achieve excellence in his or her endeavours” Ayandele stated

The Past Chairman,Nigeria Institute of Public Relations ( NIPR), Lagos Barrister Jide Ologun foremost amongst the facilitators at the course charting forum for young minds harps on the importance of concentrating on self-development early in life, rather than wasting time on things that add up nothing to one’s worth.

According to him correct networking is the key to a successful living while strategy to combat lives inevitable challenges brings about solution.

It is because we are not maximizing our potentials that is why we have resource control issue, we don’t want the younger generation to continue in this wrong direction and few of us started igniting the mindset in them.

“Irrespective of their physical location majority of people grow up in the midst of having to take right decisions.

“There are children raised up even in environment that cannot be described as Crime prone and they end up in crime because right now beyond the physical environment what about technology, online community and different kinds that are available, so it is apt to engage this minds.

“Our concern now is grooming them to take right decisions.” Ologun affirms.

Earlier the convener of BSEWN Adewale Adeleye noted that many of the students after secondary tend to be uncertain about what the future holds for them so the programme aims at charting a right course for them.

“It is a concept aimed at inspiring excellent attitude towards academic pursuit, providing adequate information on career choices, leadership and entrepreneurship, while addressing issues substance/abuse/sexual reproductive health and vices amongst the young people.

“The theme of this year’s edition “Achieving Greatness through Positive Vibes” becomes imperatives following some of the challenges known as VICES that often confront our young people on the way to the top.”, he said

CPS Saheed Olayinka Egbeyemi, the chairman Lagos State Taskforce on Environmental and Special offences, while delivering his goodwill message at the event cited the importance of the environment in ensuring an individual is well groomed.

“Seated here are future leaders, I want to make them know that Crime does not pay and education is the key to success.

“The environment determines who you are. I was able to rise to limelight just due to my mindset and poise to achieve much in life, I was born and bred in Agege but as I moved out to another serene environment my mindset changed”

Other dignitaries and facilitators who also played active roles include; Education Secretary, Agege Local Government Education Authority Hon. Olamilekan Majiyagbe; Chief Operating Officer Soulcomms, Mrs Mojisola Saka; second in command to the chairman task force, SP Adetayo Akerele; NIPR General Secretary, Lagos state, Mrs Thelma Okoh and host of others.

Respondng, Miss Nuratu Malik a student of Government College said the programme had impacted her greatly.
“Just like the chairman of Task force didn’t allow his background to put his back on the ground, I think your background should help to bring you out finally, it should not determine what you will become in future.

Abubakar Sulaiman from State Senior High School Oyewole in his reaction to the programme, said that it enlightened him more of the fact that after secondary school there is still a long way to go.

“It teaches me how to make use of the resources, I have now in order for me to have a better future.