How to transfer files from Android to PC

How to transfer files from Android to PC

It is an age-old story. File meets computer, computer wants to introduce file to its smartphone, computer can’t find the right feature for that. Transferring files (even things like high-res photos) between PC and mobile devices is often a pain, yes, but it’s not impossible. In fact there are a few different ways to do it.

In this guide by Tech Trends, you will learn exactly how to transfer files from Android to your PC, whether you want to use a software or more traditional hardware solution.

Wi-Fi transfer app

If your computer is connected to a nearby wireless network, one of the easiest ways to transfer files to a mobile device is to set up wireless transfer. These services specialize in porting information through your wireless network and onto a mobile device. Once set up, these services are quick, simple, and reliable, so long as your wireless internet connection is stable.

In fact, there are so many transfer services available, one of the hardest parts may be finding the right one for your PC. If you use an Android or iOS device, you will want to take a look at Portal, an app from Pushbullet. Once you download the app from your device’s respective app store and scan the website’s QR Code, you can push pictures, videos, and other files through the site and onto your mobile phone. It’s especially easy with Google Chrome because you can just drag and drop files to instantly transfer them from one device to another.

Another common solution is Filedrop, which is free for all systems except iOS (where it costs $3). Like Portal, Filedrop pairs with Windows, MacOS, iOS, and Android devices, and then lets you quickly transfer files with a simple drag-and-drop method.

An alternative for Apple users is Airdrop, a proprietary piece of software that works between all Macs and iOS devices without requiring you to download any additional software — here’s how to use it.

Cloud storage service

Most of the best cloud storage providers offer a reasonable alternative to Wi-Fi transfer apps. You also don’t actually need Wi-Fi for every step when using a cloud sharing service. Simply fire up your favourite browser, register for a cloud service such as Google Drive or Dropbox (but which is best?) and then upload your files. Afterward, you can download the app for your phone and — as long as you have a Wi-Fi or data connection — access the same information.

The information will remain floating in the cloud, but it’s accessible from either destination. This is useful for when you need to transfer data between different platforms, and it makes it easy to share said info with friends and coworkers.

However, both drag-and-drop transfers and cloud services have some security issues. If you’re not using a secure wireless network, then data theft is a possibility. Be smart about your transfers and sensitive information — we recommend enabling two-step verification and using a unique password (store it in a password manager) on all your cloud storage accounts.

Pair via Bluetooth

Bluetooth still has a lot of benefits in a Wi-Fi dominated age, and though pairing isn’t as quick or easy as using cloud storage, you can do it without the need of Wi-Fi. Turn on Bluetooth on your PC and mobile device, then look on your computer to see if it detects any nearby device. Try checking the “Devices and Printers” panel if there’s no automatic connection.

Most PCs will then move onto a confirmation task, where you have to type in a code or compare numbers. This will allow the computer to pair with your mobile device. The device should then appear in your list of connected drives when you look at your menu or file browser. On many PCs, you can select “Send a File” from the Bluetooth menu by clicking on the Bluetooth logo in the bottom-right corner of your screen. You can also manage Bluetooth devices more directly from the Devices and Printers panel, if necessary.

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Bluetooth is a reliable method because most devices offer Bluetooth connectivity, and once paired, it’s easy to automatically pair again. If you have a very old computer and a newer mobile device, however, there may be some trouble with matching protocols — there’s also the possibility that your computer may not have Bluetooth. Although you could purchase a Bluetooth adaptor, that doesn’t exactly help you transfer those files right now.

Try an NFC connection

NFC stands for near field communication. It’s a data transfer technology that many phones and some computers now possess. With Android Beam, look into enabling NFC transfers. This protocol requires your devices to be physically close — hence the frequent “bump” and “tap” apps — but it’s still safer when compared to wireless transfers.

That said, it’s a bit more time-consuming and often limited. Apple, for example, only uses NFC for payment purposes.

Even if you can’t establish an NFC connection directly with your PC, take a look at external hard drives and similar devices that can use NFC. This may be an easy way to quickly transfer data to and from your PC using an intermediary device. Plus, you get an external hard drive to use in other situations — these are our favourites.

Stick with email

Email is solid, dependable, sensible, and not at all exciting. Nonetheless, it’s often handy when you need to transfer files from your desktop to a nearby tablet or smartphone. Not everyone has the fancy apps, services, and connectivity listed above. That’s where email can be a lifesaver. You’ll need to login to your email account on both devices, but that’s not much of a hardship for a relatively quick and painless way of transferring files.

It’s easier than a lot of other options, and most mobile devices are now smart enough to open attachments in a readable form, especially if you use a PDF. Thanks to OneDrive and Office 365, you may also be able to open and edit Word docs directly within your email client.

There are ways to use Office for free too.

When all else fails, try a USB drive

While the commonplace USB drive has recently fallen out of favor due to wireless functionality and the aforementioned cloud, sometimes the best option is still using a flash drive or an external hard drive to move your files. Not only is setting up a USB connection safer than transferring your data wirelessly, it’s ideal when you want to save a lot of content and transfer it all at once to multiple devices without weighing down your wireless network.

The key is picking out the right USB device to use. Many Android devices, for example, use USB On-The-Go, which can pair with compatible USB storage devices and allows for quick transfers between your PC and Android device.

Another alternative to consider is a wireless media reader. These are external hard drives that use SD cards or USB drives that can create their own hotspot, thus giving you a plethora of connection options for both your PC and mobile devices. You won’t even need a wireless network nearby — just think of them as a jack-of-all-trades for moving content around.

Signs of a damaged phone battery

Signs of a damaged phone battery

•Source: www.smartphone.battery.com

You will find plenty of online discussions, whether in forums or articles on websites like this one, about phone batteries. Almost all of them are about charging and stretching out the time between charging.

According to Android Central, that is important information to know but there is also another problem you might face, especially if you keep the same phone for a couple of years – batteries don’t last forever.

Phone batteries are complicated

We have all either had to get a new battery for our car or know someone who has. Batteries are chemical power plants and once they have reached to point where they can no longer build a charge through their chemical reaction, they turn into a container for semi-toxic and expensive materials that don’t do anything. When that happens, you need to provide a new battery if you want to continue to use the things that it powers. Be sure to recycle your old battery properly, please.

Phones aren’t like cars, where changing the battery is as easy as disconnecting the old and connecting a new one. They used to be, but thinner phones and higher battery capacity demands meant that they are now small foil bags sealed up inside your phone. They are designed to last a specific number of charge cycles, and a charge cycle is taking the battery from its lowest point to its highest.

It is worth noting that this doesn’t mean zero to 100, even though the phone will report it that way. Batteries are designed to be used at 80 per cent of the listed capacity (but still safe up to 125 per cent) and never brought down to a zero-charge state. The circuitry inside your phone takes care of that and makes it simple for us by reporting the scale to zero to100.

The number of charging cycles that a battery is rated for is an approximation; they reported number is based on an average. There are ways to “game” the system when it comes to charging cycles, and you have probably seen advice that says to charge your phone a certain way to extend the usable life of the cell. These do work, but you won’t be able to get too much extra life from your phone’s original battery so it may not be worth it. You have to decide if micromanaging the way you charge your phone is worth another two or three months of life.

Signs your battery is ready to move on

A battery doesn’t just suddenly die under normal circumstances; it gives some warning signs that it’s getting close. Sometimes, batteries can just short or have another type of fault that kills them, but those instances aren’t very common. A lot of time and energy went into designing a safe and long-lasting battery for a phone.

You might notice when your battery is going downhill because it rapidly discharges while you’re using it. If you used to go half the day and your battery was still at 60 per cent, for example, and it now hits 30 per cent during the same time, it is a sign that the battery is starting to sour. Other things like bad apps or a bad update can do this, too, so it can be tricky to diagnose.

Your phone’s battery will most likely die a slow, noticeable death.

You will also notice that it won’t charge completely. No matter how long you leave it plugged in it never says it is fully charged because it’s not. It can’t hold enough electrical energy to register as full by the electronics in your phone because the materials inside have degraded enough to affect performance.

One of the first warning signs is your phone losing charge right away. If you take your phone off the charger when it says the battery is at 100 per cent and it immediately drops to 90 per cent or 80 per cent, the battery is getting a bit old. It’s normal for some phones to lose a few percentage points of battery charge right away (at least according to the battery gauge) but a drop of 10 per cent or more is a sign of a problem.

If your phone is bulging or swelled up, stop using it right now.

If you notice your phone bulging in the middle or getting very hot on or off the charger, that’s a sign of a bad battery too, but you also need to stop using it right away and take it somewhere that a tech can look at it. We have all heard stories of phones bursting from a bad battery, and the whole Note 7 thing is still fresh in our minds.

Phone batteries are safe when used as intended. Because of things like Samsung’s excellent response to Note 7s catching fire and bursting, they are safer now than ever before. But accidents and malfunctions happen. Don’t ignore any signs of excessive heat or swelling because nobody likes it when their pants (or anything else) catch fire.

You probably won’t see any of these signs for at least 18 months after you bought your phone if you bought it new. Battery life may be listed in charge cycles, but the goal is to make them last two years since that is the standard length of a carrier contract. But if you really like your phone or really like not spending money on a new one, you will see your battery die eventually.

How to change phone battery

Changing the battery in a sealed phone isn’t hard for people who know what they are doing. Most of the time.

If you are used to going online or taking a trip to the carrier store to buy a new battery for your phone, those days are gone and I doubt they will ever come back.

According to Android Central, the battery in your phone probably can be changed by someone who knows what they are doing.

Changing a phone battery isn’t hard on most models, but the way you open the two halves of a phone can be a little tricky. There may be hidden screws, plastic clips that are designed to never be unclipped, and there will be lots of sticky adhesive.

It is easy to chnage the battery on some phones with a handful of simple tools; the Nexus 4 and iPhone 4 only take a few minutes to open and change things. Other phones are not easy to open without breaking the screen. Unless you are still using a Nexus 4 or iPhone 4, forget changing the battery yourself.

Luckily, a person who can change a phone battery isn’t hard to find. If your phone is still covered under a warranty, you should talk to the people you bought it from first. If you don’t, you’re probably going to lose that warranty, so do it.

If your phone no longer has a warranty, ask a friend if they have a “phone person” they trust. If not, it is fairly safe to take a chance with someone who has a legitimate business repairing phones. Think about it. The little kiosk in the mall where someone will swap your battery in two hours while you shop wouldn’t be there if they weren’t able to do it successfully. Changing a battery is a mechanical thing — the phone comes apart a certain way, only a specific battery fits for a replacement, and the parts go back together the same way they came apart — only in reverse. For a “phone person,” it is a simple job and the hardest part is making sure they don’t scratch the screen, and remembering to wipe the fingerprints off of everything when they are finished.

If your friends don’t have a “phone person” look on Google. There are also plenty of national companies that specialise in phone repairs. You will find them listed online or even in the Yellow Pages if you ever see an old phone book. You can look at review sites like Google Maps for an overview of customer experiences, and because these franchises all operate under a specific set of policies, you can look them up to see what to expect.

Your carrier may also have a phone repair centre, even one on site in some locations. It is worth talking to them about it.

The unfixables

Some phones, like the original HTC One M7 or the Nexus 6P, are built in a way that you probably won’t find someone willing to open them to change the battery. Don’t get mad at the person you’re asking to do the repairs, because some things aren’t meant to be opened. The original iPhone was notorious for being nigh impossible to change the battery unless someone was a professional with experience. A business that specializes in quick phone repairs on site can decide it’s not worth the risk of damaging the phone by trying it.

You can see a list of popular phones and their “repairability” scores at iFixit. The easiest phones to open are at the top and the hardest are at the bottom. If your phone is near the bottom of the list you’ll probably have to let a professional have the phone for a day or two and a service that fixes things while you wait isn’t going to be an option. They need to give you back your phone looking as good as it did when you gave it to them. That’s hard to do with some phones.

Buying a new phone is not the worst thing in the world. You might have to do it.

Finally, maybe it’s time to buy a new phone. Or a new-to-you phone, even. We have you covered with our comprehensive Smartphone Buyer’s Guide. You’ll find a phone that’s the best at almost any criteria you have set, and you might even see something that you never thought of. A phone is more than a novelty in today’s society and is an important tool. It’s worth doing the research to find the one that fits you best.

#Takeaway

Common phone battery problems

Having a cell phone is great when you need to talk on the go, but if you have a faulty battery, then you may feel like you are chained to your phone’s charger.

Many things can go wrong with a phone’s battery, from the so-called “memory effect” to plain-old worn out batteries.

According to www.itstillworks.com, some issues can be corrected, but unfortunately, most will need to be addressed by replacement.

Memory effect

The memory effect is a common issue in older cell phones that use a nickel-cadmium battery. This issue occurs when the user charges the battery before it has drained repeatedly, and the battery “remembers” the point at which it was prematurely drained and then only drains from that point onward (thus losing a portion of its full battery potential.) The memory effect is only present in older cell phones, so if you have one that was made in 2005 or before, you may know of it. To prevent the memory effect from occurring, make sure to deplete your battery as much as possible before charging it.

Overcharge

Overcharge is a more common problem in modern cell phones. When you overcharge a battery, it means that you leave the phone on the charger after it has reached 100 percent. While leaving a battery on a charging station for a few hours after the charge has completed will not impact the battery too negatively, if you leave the battery on the charger for more than 24 hours you can overheat and permanently damage the battery.

Self-discharge

Did you know that even if you do not use your phone, it still uses battery life? This phenomenon is known as self-discharge. If your phone is switched off all the time, the battery life is still being used. If you do not turn it on every few weeks and charge it, the battery will die permanently. If you have a cell phone that you only use in emergencies or are keeping “just in case,” it is a good idea to turn it on and charge it at least once a month to keep it from self-discharging the battery.

Aged battery

All batteries have a certain lifespan, and after awhile you can expect them to degrade substantially. Most batteries (under normal circumstances) will last between two and three years and can handle about 500 charge cycles. If you start noticing marked battery loss after a comparable amount of time, it is probably due to your battery being old. Unfortunately, there is not much you can do about a battery getting old, and if enough time has passed, you will need to replace it to ensure your phone continues functioning as it should.

Getting the most from your battery

To prevent most of these problems from happening, and to keep your phone’s battery from aging too quickly, the best thing to do is to make the most of your charging cycle. Try and run the batterydown as much as possible before plugging it in, and, if possible, unplug it as soon as it has finished charging. You can also reduce strain on your batteries (and thus reduce the number of charge cycles) by toggling settings like screen settings, vibrate function and Bluetooth wireless network connections.

Ways to prevent your phone from being hacked

Ways to prevent your phone from being hacked

Hacking is finding a weakness in someone’s software or networks with the aim of exploiting something or gaining illegal access to secured data and information. For instance, hackers use a variety of passwords for cracking algorithm to get access to a computer system, according to Techarrival.

Who is a hacker?

A hacker is an individual or a group of individuals who looks for and takes advantage of weaknesses of computer systems and the networks to get illegal access to it. The hackers are generally highly skilled in computer programming and have knowledge about the security system of such devices.

How to prevent your phone from being hacked

In today’s times, when we humans are highly dependent upon the computers and mobile phones to do our day to day tasks, it is almost impossible to stay without them. But, the growing hacking practices are scaring the common people, as well. With the recent reports on malware attack and breaching of important data, everyone wants to protect their phones from hackers. Which is why, every year, the studies and experiments are done to stop or protect the users from getting attacked by the hackers. There are a few ways to secure your data like improving your passwords but nothing is full proof as the chances of hacking cannot be avoided, completely.

But doing something is better than doing nothing to prevent hacking. There are so many big organisations which got into trouble because of the hackers. These professional hackers are hard to trace as they do not leave a track behind them. Therefore, it is better for us to prevent ourselves because most of the cybercrime cases are difficult to get solved.

Here are some ideas that you can opt for to protect your phones from hackers and android spy apps.

Update your operating system

The very first step is to regularly update your phones. As soon as an update is ready to be downloaded and installed on your phones, do it! Un-updated phones become vulnerable to hacking so you can make the device more secured by regularly updating it. You can constantly check your phone settings for new updates. You must update your apps, as well whenever a notification is brought to your notice.

Install software

You should always download and install trustworthy and reliable phone protection apps that provide complete malware security. It is important to have a software security app on your phones to protect it from hackers and viruses. The hackers generally send you websites and emails which contain viruses, so with the help of an advanced security software, you can protect your phones from such attacks.

Password protect

To improve your phone’s security, it is important to password lock your device carefully. Keep a password that provides good strength. You can choose a pattern lock, personalised PIN, or an alphabetical-numeric password for your phone. Choose a smart password that you can remember easily but is difficult to guess by hackers. You can also fix the time your phone will take to get locked, automatically if not in use.

Trustworthy apps

It is suggested to you to only download and install apps from reputed sites such as Apple’s App Store and Play Store. First, you must visit an alleged review website to get the authentic review about the app you are planning to install. After that, you can download and install a new app.

Stay disable

It is very important that you disable Bluetooth, GPS, and Wi-Fi while you are not using it, as they allow the hackers to find your device easily with a quick scan. The hackers can easily get into your phone through these features. This is why; you can opt for settings to keep your connectivity features disabled until they are switched on manually.

Unsecured Wi-Fi

Generally, the unsecured Wi-Fi connections are open for public use. Therefore, always use a secured connection for your mobile phones. You can install a VPN or virtual private network to direct traffic through encrypted mobile connections. Do not access your online banking services on an unsecured network connection.

Unlocking methods

Do not get excited about fingerprint and face recognition features. Hackers can simply copy your fingerprints from something that you have held or simply use your picture to unlock your phones. So, avoid using simple unlocking phone methods, instead, go for complicated options to get better security. It is suggested to your alphanumerical password PIN to lock your phones. Your password should not be something personal like your pet’s name or boyfriend’s name or your car or phone number. It should be something hard to guess.

Data backup

You can also take a regular backup of your mobile phone data in your hard disk or on Google storage. After that, you can regularly clean the phone’s data. So, if in case a hacker hacks your mobile phone, it would be a blank file for him and he cannot steal your important data from it.

Keep deleting

You must clean up your memory regularly, every month. You are supposed to delete the unwanted data and apps from your phone. This makes your phone works faster and safer.

Credit: PUNCH.